Timothy WillardComment

Timothy WillardComment
Despite the quality of language that strikes us nowadays as majestic, grandly alienated, perhaps what it most notable about the words of the Prayer Book are their simplicity and directness. C. S. Lewis called this “pithiness”; I would add “coziness” or “comfortability.” The Prayer Book was a handbook of worship for a people, not for a priesthood, and its job was to replace and improve, without entirely abolishing, those ancient collective rites of worship that bound people together in the English Catholic Church. The marriage service, for instance, was a medieval liturgy that long predated the final form it found in the Book of Common Prayer. For centuries people had been plighting their troth in words not dissimilar to Cranmer’s. It availed Cranmer nothing to invent a liturgy that threw out that history and erected, by force of rhetorical grandeur, a verbal screen of altar between the priest and his congregation. Though there is a theological sternness to Cranmer’s prayers, there is also an approachability about them; ordinary phrases and familiar biblical similes are used.
— James Wood, from his introduction to the Penguin Classics edition of the BCP (via bookofcommonprayer)

Timothy Willard loves to sit with his wife by the bonfire and make up stories about Tom the Backyard-Badger for his three lovely daughters. When he's not carving up the Appalachian Mountains on his Salsa El Mariachi, you can find him busy writing a book, collaborating on a book, or reading a book written by someone dead and gone. Timothy studied beauty in the works of C.S. Lewis under theologian Alister McGrath. The author of five books, including Veneer: Living Deeply in a Surface Society (Zondervan), Timothy is currently finishing The Life-Changing Adventure of Chasing Beauty (Eerdmans, 2019), preparing his doctoral thesis for publication, and trying to find a publisher for his first novel The Tempest and the Bloom. He lives somewhere in the south Charlotte woods.