Timothy WillardComment

Timothy WillardComment
This caught me. The image, the verse. I’ve been considering the benefit of sadness and melancholy and how, in a strange way, both can bring a kind of joy as we move through them. Always there is movement, melancholy, into light, into contemplation. Perhaps “The Great Sadness” exists because there is, in fact, “A Great Joy.” And that is where we’re headed … though some get mired in the melancholy.  theparisreview: The Great Sadness You can’t look at yourself in the ocean. Your looks fall apart like tendrils of light. Night on earth. —Federico García Lorca. Photography credit Yale Joel.

This caught me. The image, the verse. I’ve been considering the benefit of sadness and melancholy and how, in a strange way, both can bring a kind of joy as we move through them. Always there is movement, melancholy, into light, into contemplation. Perhaps “The Great Sadness” exists because there is, in fact, “A Great Joy.” And that is where we’re headed … though some get mired in the melancholy. 

theparisreview:

The Great Sadness

You can’t look at yourself
in the ocean.
Your looks fall apart
like tendrils of light.
Night on earth.

Federico García Lorca. Photography credit Yale Joel.

Tim's authored four books, including Shine So Brighta children's Christmas story, and is finishing his first novel. He and his wife, Christine, co-founded The Edges and are writing a book they hope will inspire married couples to stick together no matter what. 

Tim lives in Charlotte, North Carolina with Christine and their three pixie-daughters. Sign-up here to follow their work.