Timothy WillardComment

Timothy WillardComment
This caught me. The image, the verse. I’ve been considering the benefit of sadness and melancholy and how, in a strange way, both can bring a kind of joy as we move through them. Always there is movement, melancholy, into light, into contemplation. Perhaps “The Great Sadness” exists because there is, in fact, “A Great Joy.” And that is where we’re headed … though some get mired in the melancholy.  

  theparisreview : 
 
  The Great Sadness  
 You can’t look at yourself in the ocean. Your looks fall apart like tendrils of light. Night on earth. 
 — Federico García Lorca . Photography credit  Yale Joel .

This caught me. The image, the verse. I’ve been considering the benefit of sadness and melancholy and how, in a strange way, both can bring a kind of joy as we move through them. Always there is movement, melancholy, into light, into contemplation. Perhaps “The Great Sadness” exists because there is, in fact, “A Great Joy.” And that is where we’re headed … though some get mired in the melancholy. 

theparisreview:

The Great Sadness

You can’t look at yourself
in the ocean.
Your looks fall apart
like tendrils of light.
Night on earth.

Federico García Lorca. Photography credit Yale Joel.

Timothy Willard is the author of five books, including Longing For More: Daily Reflections on Finding God in the Rhythms of Life and the forthcoming The Life-Giving Adventure of Chasing Beauty (Eerdmans, 2019). He has collaborated on over 20 books and has written, consulted and served as spiritual director for organizations such as Chick-fil-A, Catalyst, Q Ideas and Praxis Labs. When he’s not riding the trails in the Appalachian mountains you can find him by the fire with his three daughters and his wife making up stories about Tom the back yard badger. He lives somewhere in the south Charlotte woods.